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Veteran's Day has always been one of those days I never got off school, so I never paid much attention. I'm guessing even those who do get the day off don't give it the attention it deserves. One of my coworkers just told me a story about his daughter:

Daughter: Woohoo, we have the day off!

Dad: What for?
Daughter: Veteran's Day
Dad: Do you know what a veteran is?
Daughter: No
Dad: Brief definition of veterans, and tells her that grandpa is one.
Daughter: Ok, can I put the radio back on?

Rather than let another Veterans day go by unnoticed, let's this opportunity to inform kids about the sacrifices and patriotism of soldiers and veterans.

Check out some classroom activities and guides at http://www1.va.gov/opa/vetsday/index.asp.

Here's a brief overview of how Veterans Day came to be:

In November 1919, President Wilson proclaimed November 11 as the first commemoration of Armistice Day with the following words: "To us in America, the reflections of Armistice Day will be filled with solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the country’s service and with gratitude for the victory, both because of the thing from which it has freed us and because of the opportunity it has given America to show her sympathy with peace and justice in the councils of the nations…" Read more

In 1926, Congress officially declared November 11 to be Veterans Day.

On this Veterans Day, VA Secretary Dr. James B. Peake shares his thoughts about the holiday:

"Ninety years ago today, the guns fell silent in Europe. World War I – the “war to end all wars” – was over. Almost five million Americans served during that first modern, mechanized war. Our last living link with them, 107-year-old Army veteran Frank Buckles, observes this Veterans Day at his farm in West Virginia."

It is important, on Veterans Day, for all Americans to reflect on the service and sacrifice of our veterans, from Mr. Buckles to the men and women who recently fought for us in Iraq and Afghanistan. Their bravery, their resourcefulness, and their patriotism mark them as our nation’s finest citizens.

If you want to learn more about veteran organizations, get involved or make a donation, check out http://www1.va.gov/VSO/index.cfm?template=view

Commemorate the veterans or soldiers in your life in the comments section.

Veteran's Day has always been one of those days I never got off school, so I never paid much attention. I'm guessing even those who do get the day off don't give it the attention it deserves. One of my coworkers just told me a story about his daughter:

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Just because you're showing a movie before the end of term doesn't mean you are abandoning learning.

Here are a few ways to get the most educational value out of holiday favorites. 

Character Education with Rudolph

Get

Use Rudolph to create a lesson about being different and special. Have students write down what makes them special (either adjectives for younger students or essays for older students) and share in group. Rudolph is a great tie in to teaching tolerance and anti-bullying messages.

Creative Writing & Clashing Cultures with Elf

Get

Buddy becomes an author, so why can't they? Students can try to write holiday-inspired stories.

 

For social studies, Elf demonstrates the culture clash that can take place between people from different homelands. Buddy only knows the life of an elf, with their rules and their clothes and their main professions. When he comes to America, he struggles to fit in. When have your students traveled somewhere where they felt out of place?

Simple Machines & Geography with Home Alone

Get

A Science-lovers dream. He uses all kind of simple machines and scientific principles to outsmart the bad guys, including using the conductivity of the door handle to burn their hands, a pendulum to propel paint cans and gravity, gravity, gravity.

 

There's also a geography connection because the family is in Paris. Where is Paris? How far is it from their home? What are ways the mom can take to travel there?

Practices Tenses & Economics A Christmas Carol

Get

Scrooge loves his money. What a great tie in to counting and even economic principals? Why do some people have lots of money and some people have very little?

 

The three ghosts also demonstrate the concept of past, present and future tense in a concrete way.

Language Learning with Holiday Favorites

 

The Nightmare Before Christmas
Most students know the general storyline for their favorite holiday shows. Watching holiday favorites in another language can help to bridge the gap for beginning language learners.

 

Share your favorite movies to share in class and how you work them into the curriculum in the comments section!

 

Just because you're showing a movie before the end of term doesn't mean you are abandoning learning. Here are a few ways to get the most educational value out of holiday favorites.

0

Just because you're showing a movie before the end of term doesn't mean you are abandoning learning.

Here are a few ways to get the most educational value out of holiday favorites. 

Character Education with Rudolph

Get

Use Rudolph to create a lesson about being different and special. Have students write down what makes them special (either adjectives for younger students or essays for older students) and share in group. Rudolph is a great tie in to teaching tolerance and anti-bullying messages.

Creative Writing & Clashing Cultures with Elf

Get

Buddy becomes an author, so why can't they? Students can try to write holiday-inspired stories.

 

For social studies, Elf demonstrates the culture clash that can take place between people from different homelands. Buddy only knows the life of an elf, with their rules and their clothes and their main professions. When he comes to America, he struggles to fit in. When have your students traveled somewhere where they felt out of place?

Simple Machines & Geography with Home Alone

Get

A Science-lovers dream. He uses all kind of simple machines and scientific principles to outsmart the bad guys, including using the conductivity of the door handle to burn their hands, a pendulum to propel paint cans and gravity, gravity, gravity.

 

There's also a geography connection because the family is in Paris. Where is Paris? How far is it from their home? What are ways the mom can take to travel there?

Practices Tenses & Economics A Christmas Carol

Get

Scrooge loves his money. What a great tie in to counting and even economic principals? Why do some people have lots of money and some people have very little?

 

The three ghosts also demonstrate the concept of past, present and future tense in a concrete way.

Language Learning with Holiday Favorites

 

The Nightmare Before Christmas
Most students know the general storyline for their favorite holiday shows. Watching holiday favorites in another language can help to bridge the gap for beginning language learners.

 

Share your favorite movies to share in class and how you work them into the curriculum in the comments section!

 

Just because you're showing a movie before the end of term doesn't mean you are abandoning learning. Here are a few ways to get the most educational value out of holiday favorites.

0

Just because you're showing a movie before the end of term doesn't mean you are abandoning learning.

Here are a few ways to get the most educational value out of holiday favorites. 

Character Education with Rudolph

Get

Use Rudolph to create a lesson about being different and special. Have students write down what makes them special (either adjectives for younger students or essays for older students) and share in group. Rudolph is a great tie in to teaching tolerance and anti-bullying messages.

Creative Writing & Clashing Cultures with Elf

Get

Buddy becomes an author, so why can't they? Students can try to write holiday-inspired stories.

 

For social studies, Elf demonstrates the culture clash that can take place between people from different homelands. Buddy only knows the life of an elf, with their rules and their clothes and their main professions. When he comes to America, he struggles to fit in. When have your students traveled somewhere where they felt out of place?

Simple Machines & Geography with Home Alone

Get

A Science-lovers dream. He uses all kind of simple machines and scientific principles to outsmart the bad guys, including using the conductivity of the door handle to burn their hands, a pendulum to propel paint cans and gravity, gravity, gravity.

 

There's also a geography connection because the family is in Paris. Where is Paris? How far is it from their home? What are ways the mom can take to travel there?

Practices Tenses & Economics A Christmas Carol

Get

Scrooge loves his money. What a great tie in to counting and even economic principals? Why do some people have lots of money and some people have very little?

 

The three ghosts also demonstrate the concept of past, present and future tense in a concrete way.

Language Learning with Holiday Favorites

 

The Nightmare Before Christmas
Most students know the general storyline for their favorite holiday shows. Watching holiday favorites in another language can help to bridge the gap for beginning language learners.

 

Share your favorite movies to share in class and how you work them into the curriculum in the comments section!

 

Just because you're showing a movie before the end of term doesn't mean you are abandoning learning. Here are a few ways to get the most educational value out of holiday favorites.

1

Just because you're showing a movie before the end of term doesn't mean you are abandoning learning.

Here are a few ways to get the most educational value out of holiday favorites. 

Character Education with Rudolph

Get

Use Rudolph to create a lesson about being different and special. Have students write down what makes them special (either adjectives for younger students or essays for older students) and share in group. Rudolph is a great tie in to teaching tolerance and anti-bullying messages.

Creative Writing & Clashing Cultures with Elf

Get

Buddy becomes an author, so why can't they? Students can try to write holiday-inspired stories.

 

For social studies, Elf demonstrates the culture clash that can take place between people from different homelands. Buddy only knows the life of an elf, with their rules and their clothes and their main professions. When he comes to America, he struggles to fit in. When have your students traveled somewhere where they felt out of place?

Simple Machines & Geography with Home Alone

Get

A Science-lovers dream. He uses all kind of simple machines and scientific principles to outsmart the bad guys, including using the conductivity of the door handle to burn their hands, a pendulum to propel paint cans and gravity, gravity, gravity.

 

There's also a geography connection because the family is in Paris. Where is Paris? How far is it from their home? What are ways the mom can take to travel there?

Practices Tenses & Economics A Christmas Carol

Get

Scrooge loves his money. What a great tie in to counting and even economic principals? Why do some people have lots of money and some people have very little?

 

The three ghosts also demonstrate the concept of past, present and future tense in a concrete way.

Language Learning with Holiday Favorites

 

The Nightmare Before Christmas
Most students know the general storyline for their favorite holiday shows. Watching holiday favorites in another language can help to bridge the gap for beginning language learners.

 

Share your favorite movies to share in class and how you work them into the curriculum in the comments section!

 

Just because you're showing a movie before the end of term doesn't mean you are abandoning learning. Here are a few ways to get the most educational value out of holiday favorites.

1

Just because you're showing a movie before the end of term doesn't mean you are abandoning learning.

Here are a few ways to get the most educational value out of holiday favorites. 

Character Education with Rudolph

Get

Use Rudolph to create a lesson about being different and special. Have students write down what makes them special (either adjectives for younger students or essays for older students) and share in group. Rudolph is a great tie in to teaching tolerance and anti-bullying messages.

Creative Writing & Clashing Cultures with Elf

Get

Buddy becomes an author, so why can't they? Students can try to write holiday-inspired stories.

 

For social studies, Elf demonstrates the culture clash that can take place between people from different homelands. Buddy only knows the life of an elf, with their rules and their clothes and their main professions. When he comes to America, he struggles to fit in. When have your students traveled somewhere where they felt out of place?

Simple Machines & Geography with Home Alone

Get

A Science-lovers dream. He uses all kind of simple machines and scientific principles to outsmart the bad guys, including using the conductivity of the door handle to burn their hands, a pendulum to propel paint cans and gravity, gravity, gravity.

 

There's also a geography connection because the family is in Paris. Where is Paris? How far is it from their home? What are ways the mom can take to travel there?

Practices Tenses & Economics A Christmas Carol

Get

Scrooge loves his money. What a great tie in to counting and even economic principals? Why do some people have lots of money and some people have very little?

 

The three ghosts also demonstrate the concept of past, present and future tense in a concrete way.

Language Learning with Holiday Favorites

 

The Nightmare Before Christmas
Most students know the general storyline for their favorite holiday shows. Watching holiday favorites in another language can help to bridge the gap for beginning language learners.

 

Share your favorite movies to share in class and how you work them into the curriculum in the comments section!

 

Just because you're showing a movie before the end of term doesn't mean you are abandoning learning. Here are a few ways to get the most educational value out of holiday favorites.

0

Just because you're showing a movie before the end of term doesn't mean you are abandoning learning.

Here are a few ways to get the most educational value out of holiday favorites. 

Character Education with Rudolph

Get

Use Rudolph to create a lesson about being different and special. Have students write down what makes them special (either adjectives for younger students or essays for older students) and share in group. Rudolph is a great tie in to teaching tolerance and anti-bullying messages.

Creative Writing & Clashing Cultures with Elf

Get

Buddy becomes an author, so why can't they? Students can try to write holiday-inspired stories.

 

For social studies, Elf demonstrates the culture clash that can take place between people from different homelands. Buddy only knows the life of an elf, with their rules and their clothes and their main professions. When he comes to America, he struggles to fit in. When have your students traveled somewhere where they felt out of place?

Simple Machines & Geography with Home Alone

Get

A Science-lovers dream. He uses all kind of simple machines and scientific principles to outsmart the bad guys, including using the conductivity of the door handle to burn their hands, a pendulum to propel paint cans and gravity, gravity, gravity.

 

There's also a geography connection because the family is in Paris. Where is Paris? How far is it from their home? What are ways the mom can take to travel there?

Practices Tenses & Economics A Christmas Carol

Get

Scrooge loves his money. What a great tie in to counting and even economic principals? Why do some people have lots of money and some people have very little?

 

The three ghosts also demonstrate the concept of past, present and future tense in a concrete way.

Language Learning with Holiday Favorites

 

The Nightmare Before Christmas
Most students know the general storyline for their favorite holiday shows. Watching holiday favorites in another language can help to bridge the gap for beginning language learners.

 

Share your favorite movies to share in class and how you work them into the curriculum in the comments section!

 

Just because you're showing a movie before the end of term doesn't mean you are abandoning learning. Here are a few ways to get the most educational value out of holiday favorites.

0

Just because you're showing a movie before the end of term doesn't mean you are abandoning learning.

Here are a few ways to get the most educational value out of holiday favorites. 

Character Education with Rudolph

Get

Use Rudolph to create a lesson about being different and special. Have students write down what makes them special (either adjectives for younger students or essays for older students) and share in group. Rudolph is a great tie in to teaching tolerance and anti-bullying messages.

Creative Writing & Clashing Cultures with Elf

Get

Buddy becomes an author, so why can't they? Students can try to write holiday-inspired stories.

 

For social studies, Elf demonstrates the culture clash that can take place between people from different homelands. Buddy only knows the life of an elf, with their rules and their clothes and their main professions. When he comes to America, he struggles to fit in. When have your students traveled somewhere where they felt out of place?

Simple Machines & Geography with Home Alone

Get

A Science-lovers dream. He uses all kind of simple machines and scientific principles to outsmart the bad guys, including using the conductivity of the door handle to burn their hands, a pendulum to propel paint cans and gravity, gravity, gravity.

 

There's also a geography connection because the family is in Paris. Where is Paris? How far is it from their home? What are ways the mom can take to travel there?

Practices Tenses & Economics A Christmas Carol

Get

Scrooge loves his money. What a great tie in to counting and even economic principals? Why do some people have lots of money and some people have very little?

 

The three ghosts also demonstrate the concept of past, present and future tense in a concrete way.

Language Learning with Holiday Favorites

 

The Nightmare Before Christmas
Most students know the general storyline for their favorite holiday shows. Watching holiday favorites in another language can help to bridge the gap for beginning language learners.

 

Share your favorite movies to share in class and how you work them into the curriculum in the comments section!

 

Just because you're showing a movie before the end of term doesn't mean you are abandoning learning. Here are a few ways to get the most educational value out of holiday favorites.

0

Websites Every Teacher Will LoveHere is a gold mine of edu-websites that every teacher should check out.

Iknowthat.com – High energy, engaging games in math, Language Arts, Science, Social Studies, The Arts, and thinking games all to be found here either by subject or grade level.

Into the Book - a reading comprehension resource for K-4 students and teachers. We focus on eight research-based strategies: Using Prior Knowledge, Making Connections, Questioning, Visualizing, Inferring, Summarizing, Evaluating and Synthesizing. Your class can watch our engaging 15-minute videos, and try the online interactive activities.

Behind the Lesson provides teachers with information and teaching resources for each strategy. Watch our 10-minute professional development videos, and explore the Web site for lesson plans, video and audio clips, downloads, and more.

Math Baseball - FunBrain.com, an award-winning interactive learning and "edutainment Web site" links K-8 children, parents, and teachers together with its fun math baseball game that you can play by yourself or with friends. It gives you a choice of math problems and the level you want to practice. Click on the Games icon for other games available through their site, some going up to grade 12, age seventeen.

Hippocampus.com – At this incredible site, you can find ready-made presentations and lessons for the your high school course or create your own mini-site for your students.
US History – Great Awakening

CELLS alive! - High resolution electron microscopy and slick animations demonstrate the mechanics of HIV infection, allergy and mite interactions, how antibodies are made, bacterial motility, ulcer-causing bacteria, how lymphocytes kill infected cells, etc. Video clips require QuickTime or AVI.

 

What websites and online games do your students love? Share in the comments section!  

Here is a gold mine of hands-on websites that every teacher should check out.
 

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Teacher DiscountsAs if we're all not stressed enough about going back to school, now we have to worry about spending money on clothes, classroom decorations, school supplies and all the other must-haves that accompany a new school year.

To save you some anxiety and make the most of your time and money, we've found the best back-to-school deals for teachers:

One-stop Savings

Before going into store-by-store list, I'd like to share some brilliant advice I just got:  Hit the Sunday ads!

Word is, Office Max, Walmart, Target and other big retailers will meet the lowest advertised prices on items. In one trip, one mom saved $30 and lots of time by showing up armed with her ads. I’m not sure if this is a national policy, so it’s probably a good idea to call the store you’re visiting before filling up your cart. 

Remember: Bring the ads with you!!

Now back to the highlights on highlighters and other such school supplies. You may want to make your first stop Staples. When asking about deals, Staples seems to top everyone's list.  

Save on School Supplies

Deals will vary week to week, but these big box stores usually offer the best deals. Visit these links for the latest deals this week!  

Staples Back to School Deals

Show your school idea to extend limits on super-cheap supplies. For instance one cent folders are limited to 5 per customer, but teachers can get 25.

Check out the Teacher Appreciation Day coming up near you. The first 100 teachers get free gifts.

Office Max Back to School Deals

If you're a Max Card for Teachers member, you need to take advantage of Teacher Appreciation Day Aug. 8.  Teachers get a reusable bag. Anything you can fit in that bag is 15% off.

In the past, they've also offered free laminating for teachers toward the end of August. Word is that promotion might be significantly downgraded, but ask your local store if they will be offering anything similar this year.

Walmart Back to School Deals

As of yet, Walmart hasn't announced any special teacher savings events, but it's always one of the cheapest places around for school supplies. Stay tuned for updates on any special promotions!  

Supplies will get cheaper as that first day of school gets closer, so you might want to wait a few weeks for the best deals. Regardless of your shopping timeline, don't forget to get the lowest prices in one stop by bringing in ads from local competitors for them to beat!

Year-Round Teacher Deals

Office Depot Star Teacher Program

Their Star Teacher Program lets you earn money back on purchases, percent varies depending on product, for you and your school.

This is in addition to sale prices on school supplies for Back to School as well.

Barnes and Noble for Teachers

This bookseller always offers 20% off classroom purchases (I trust that you can be creative enough to make that fit just about anything.)

Application

Joann Fabric Teacher Rewards

For you crafty ones out there, Joann Fabrics offers a Teacher Discount 15% off purchases year round. Joann Fabric is also hosting Teacher Appreciation Days Aug. 14 & 15 where teachers get 20% off and a free tote bag.

Michaels Teacher Discounts

Teachers save 15% at Michaels everyday.

Container Store Organized Teacher Discount

Teachers in the program save 15%.

Teacher Clothes Discounts

J.Crew Teacher Discount

15% off with valid teacher ID

Ann Taylor Loft Teacher Discount

15% off with valid teacher ID

The Limited Teacher Discount

15% off with valid teacher ID

Lakeshore Learning Teachers Club

Save 15% of select classroom supplies and get monthly deals.

Ed Tech Deals for Back to School

Apple Teacher Discounts

Special Back to School Promotion

Free iPod touch with purchase of a Mac

Special educator pricing

Also check out iTunes University for free classroom downloads

Dell Teacher Discounts

Special promotional deals on Educator page

Otherwise, 7% discount on most other items 

HP Teacher Discount

Up to 15% when you sign up for the Academic Purchase Program as a student or teacher

JourneyEd.com Teacher Discount

This site was recommended to TeachHUB.com for having consistently low prices. Carry a lot of computer software and accessories.

Back to School Sales Tax Breaks 

Even with the economy in the gutter, 18 states are offering tax holidays for back-to-school shoppers. Find your state's sales tax holiday here!

What other amazing deals and discounts have you come across? Share in the comments section!

As if we're all not stressed enough about going back to school, now we have to worry about spending money on clothes, classroom decorations, school supplies and all the other must-haves that accompany a new school year.

 

To save you some anxiety and make the most of your time and money, we've found the best back-to-school deals for teachers:

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