Latest Education News List

By: Science Under the Microscope

As a techie, I couldn't be more excited for the iPad, but as a teacher, I wonder if its an anti-learning technology?   I am excited by the way the iPad can revolutionize the reading of books (and comic books!), surfing the web, watching TV/movies, and even just "living room" computing in general. While it is not a replacement for a full laptop, the iPad is a fantastic tool for the storage and consumption of media... And that's where my concern kicks in.

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Max Elliot Anderson grew up as a reluctant reader. After his own experience and surveying the market, he sense the need for action-adventures and mysteries for readers 8 – 13, especially boys.   Using his extensive experience in the production of motion pictures, videos, and television commercials, Anderson brings the same visual excitement and heart-pounding action to his stories.Anderson has published eight books so far with many more on the horizon.    He shares how his distaste for reading as a boy led him to writing childrens books in this TeachHUB exclusive.

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By: Bronx Classroom Tales

I recently watched a feature on PBS which followed two principals over the course of a year. I was struck by a question that one of principals asked her teachers, something along the lines of, “write down the name of your weakest student and what she or he specifically needs to work on to get back on track.”  

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By: Amber Johnson
Google for teachers

It's Google's world, we're just teaching in it. Now, we can use it a little easier. With classes, homework, and projects–not to mention your social life–time is truly at a premium for you, so why not latch onto the wide world that Google has to offer? From super-effective search tricks to Google tools specifically for education to tricks and tips for using Gmail, Google Docs, and Google Calendar, these tricks will surely save you some precious time.

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By: Science Under the Microscope

  With grants growing more competitive by the day, DonorsChoose still pays off.   It should come as no surprise that the current economic downturn, along with its impact on school budgets, has pushed more educators to grantwriting. I find myself writing more than three times as many grant applications as year as I have in the past. Some of these are for simple supplies to use in my classroom, while others are large, ambitious projects to revolutionize my entire Science department.   With an increase in applications and, I would imagine, no more money to disperse, the success rate has also dropped significantly. I once held a 10-0 record of successful grant applications. This year alone, however, I have been turned down for three different grants. In fact, the only arena in which I have hit “pay dirt” is DonorsChoose.org.

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