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7 Surefire Tips to Find a Teaching Job

Laura Adams

Have you just completed your degree and are looking to find a teaching job? Are you a seasoned teacher who is looking for an exciting new challenge? Or are you a professional outside of the education industry who is looking to make a career switch to a teaching position?

Finding a new teaching opportunity can be a daunting process, especially since seasoned teachers with tenure or long-standing success at a school are typically automatically re-invited to teach each school year. The result is that available teaching positions may be limited, and the competition for these positions fierce. 

A big part of the job search process is knowing where to look for teaching positions.

The following tips and tricks are designed to take some of the headache out of your search, by giving you some guidelines on steps you can take to, utimately, find a teaching job.

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Make the HR Rounds

Visit the Human Resources and/or recruiting departments of local school systems and universities to inquire about available positions. If there are no current vacancies, ask if you can submit your resume to remain on file should future openings match what you are seeking. Keep in mind that schools do the bulk of their hiring several months before the new school year starts.

Don't Be Too Good to Substitute

Accept a substitute teaching position at the school(s) at which you are focusing your job search. This will not only allow you to network at the school by putting in the midst of fellow teachers and administrators, but also allow you to meet some of the students you may be teaching. It is not unusual for substitute teachers who have made a strong bond with the students to be offered a full-time position when an opening comes up.

Find a Teaching Job by Building Relationships

Take time to get to know and develop a relationship with the administrators at the school(s) you are interested in. Your likelihood of landing an interview (leading to a position) as a “known commodity” is higher than it is for a nameless teacher who on one has met.

Visit Career Centers

Colleges and universities that offer teaching degrees often have a database of available positions in the school’s Career Center. Career Center advisors are also excellent sources of information on how to network in the industry and get your foot in the door. Many school limit Career Center resource access to current students or alumni, though, so you may be limited to your alma matar.

Network, network, network!

Let friends, family, and casual acquaintances know that you are on the market for a new position. Since most companies are much more willing to interview (and potentially hire) candidates who have already been vouched for, it’s important to get the word out that you are available and seeking a new opportunity.

Don’t forgot to investigate often-overlooked teaching avenues such as:

  • Tutoring – either one-on-one student tutoring or tutoring through an established company such as the Sylvan Learning Center
  • Corporate trainers
  • Adjunct faculty positions
  • Universities and colleges seeking teachers for teaching degree programs
  • Mentorship / Shadowing programs

Look for Part-Time or Contract Positions 

Don’t be adverse to accepting a contract or “training” position. This are often a great way to get you foot in the door in the teaching profession. It also gives you a chance to evaluate a school to ensure it is a match before fully committing yourself to a long-term full-time position.

Search, Search, Search

Use the Internet. Searching for “teacher”, “educator”, “professor” or “teaching” on major job boards will unearth hundreds of available openings – just be aware that competition for these positions is stiff since hundreds of other teachers are looking at and applying for the exact same jobs. 

Searching teaching-specific job boards for available opportunities is a great way to target only those jobs that require your degree and background. There are a number of excellent sites that specialize in teachers jobs. You can find details at my site below. 

What tips and tricks can you share to finding a teaching job? Share in the comments section!

About the Author: Laura Adams is a qualified careers advisor with 11 years experience. Teachers Jobs Information - Resources, News, Tips and Views to help Teachers find their dream jobs. http://www.Teaching-Job.info

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