How are the seats arranged in your classroom?
View Recent Polls

Comments

Cindy Wilkins's picture

Even though I teach grades 7-9, I use learning stations all year. My desks are arranged in different stations that correlate to the current unit of study. Right now I have the class divided into 8 learning stations.

Lisa M's picture

My students decided that they wanted to sit in two long rows placed together. So have a two groups of 12 tables.

Julie Troletti's picture

My seats have gone from groups to two "E" shapes facing each other. I always find that right before spring break some kids need a break from each other! Between the talking and the seperating of some kids, this way has been very effective in increasing students' attention and productivity. There is still opportunity for collaboration, but for individual work as well.

Julie Troletti's picture

My seats have gone from groups to two "E" shapes facing each other. I always find that right before spring break some kids need a break from each other! Between the talking and the seperating of some kids, this way has been very effective in increasing students' attention and productivity. There is still opportunity for collaboration, but for individual work as well.

Clary's picture

I am a Spanish teacher so I encourage conversation and collaboration. My classroom is set up ing groups of 4. For test I rearrange the classroom in rows.

Sandra Campbell's picture

My third grade students' desks are arranged in various group to accommodate my stations throught out the day.

Laura Marschke's picture

I have large tables that fit about 5 students each, some are in rows and some line the big wall of my classroom. Students typically end up grouped around only a few of the tables during work time though... yay collaboration!

Jen Gossert's picture

I teach in a computer lab - I have two tow lines of 7 computers lined up "head-to-Head" and then one short line against one wall (so I can see screens as I instruct from anywhere in the room) and another line against the opposite wall...
It leaves a lot of space open for us to record video, collaborate and be able to move... changed it last year from rows that I could NEVER navigate between. love this set up! FOr the visual folks out there: | || |

Terry Gardner's picture

I change the seating on a regular basis depending on the the lessons that we are doing. I use groups of three or four for small group projects. I use a horseshoe arrangement for whole group discussion. We have rows at other times. I believe flexible seating is very important. Moving kids around gives them a chance to learn to work alongside everyone and be respectful of a need to create a climate that works for all learners.

Linda's picture

I use all of the configurations. Depending upon the activity or lesson configuration changes. Keeps students on their toes. They are always wondering what will be going on in the classroom when they see the seats rearrange.

Shelley's picture

My students sit in pods consisting of four desks. Last year, my students arranged the room this way, and they loved it. I tried it this year, and it is still working well. When we have a test, I just announce, "Break out!" and they quickly arrange the room into rows until the test ends.

Brandi's picture

Due to space constraints, I have my desks in threes as opposed to pairs.

E's picture

Unfortunately, I share my room with four other teachers and got tired of rearranging the seats everyday in a U shape. So I have 7 rows of 6 desks...not good

Frank Rodgers's picture

Our desks are oushed together to make a sorta square shape. But we have like six, and six and five to equal 3 groups.

Linda Parker Stephens's picture

I teach special education so I teach several different grades and subjects at one time. I have three areas that have U shape desks: one U shape for reading groups, one for math groups, and one for writing groups. Then I have a few single desk for students that have problems working in groups.