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Classroom Activities Honoring the Student of the Week

Janelle Cox

Young children love to be in the spotlight, and having a “Star of week” is a great way to honor each individual student.

The star of the week concept is meant for students to share a little bit about themselves with their classmates. By taking center stage, students feel a sense of pride while they get to share fascinating facts and stories about themselves and their life with their peers. It also helps to build a sense of community because students are celebrating each other every week. Each day consists of a new exciting event or classroom activities that relate to the “Star.”

The specific classroom activities that you choose to do depend upon the age of the children and how much time you have allotted to devote to the project each day. It’s important to mention that you must send home a note to parents explaining that their child is the star of the week, and describe what each day of the week will entail. Here are several different classroom activities that you can do. You will find two options to choose from for each day of the week. Do them all or do just a few, it’s up to you.

Classroom Activities for Monday: Poster Day/In the Spotlight

Poster Day – The star of the week will receive a poster on the Friday before they will be star of the week. Parents are asked to help their child complete the poster and return it the following Monday. The poster will be shared by the student and displayed in the classroom for the entire week. Students are encouraged to add photographs to the poster and be prepared to answer questions about the poster from their peers.

In the Spotlight – The star of the week will get their very own bulletin board dedicated to them. There will be a large star with their picture in the middle of it. Surrounding their picture will be facts about the child. Children are encouraged to bring in pictures and mementos to add to the bulletin board which will be displayed all week. Students will shine a light (literally the student will be under a spotlight while his/her classmates ask them questions) on the star of the week. Students must be prepared to answer any questions his/her peers have for them.

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Tuesday: Favorite Book/Sharing Sack

Favorite Book – The star students will bring in his or her favorite picture book to share with the class. Depending upon the age of the child, the student can read it to the class or the teacher can.

Sharing Sack – On the Friday before they are student of the week (when the star student is chosen) they will receive a sack to bring home and fill with any special items that they would like to share with the class. On this day the student will take each special artifact out of the sack and share it with their classmates.

Wednesday: Parent Letter/Special Duties

Parent Letter – Parents are asked to write a letter to the class about their child. The content in the letter is up to the parent but you can give them some ideas, like to describe a funny or special story, write a poem about their child, tell interesting facts that no one knows about them, or tell the class how proud they are of their child. Have parents send in the letter in a sealed envelope so their child cannot read it. The letter will be read to the class as some point during the day.

Special Duties – The star of the week gets to choose several special duties that they will conduct each day. Have a list of classroom duties that the student may choose from. Here are a few ideas: Line leader, teacher’s assistant, classroom messenger, etc.

Thursday: Mystery Bag/Luncheon

Mystery Bag – The star student is asked to bring in one special artifact that is very special to them and hide it in a mystery bag. They must be prepared with three clues about the artifact for their classmates to guess, along with a background story about the item. Classmates are encouraged to ask questions about the artifact so students must be prepare to answer them.

Luncheon – Parents are invited to join their child for a special luncheon in the cafeteria. They can also choose to invite a sibling or special family member. If parents or other family members are unable to attend the luncheon, the teacher will join them for a special lunch in the classroom.

Friday: Friendly Letter/Star Friends

Friendly Letter – On Friday students will write the star of the week a friendly letter. Each letter will tell the star some positive things about themselves as well as what the classmate has in common with them. The letters will be bound and made into a class book that the child can take home with them and keep.

Star Friends – The star of the week will receive a class poster of the star that was on the bulletin board with their picture. It will include compliments from each student in the class as well as special drawings from the students.

How do you honor your star of the week? Do you have any different events or activities that you do in your classroom? Please share your ideas in the comment section below, we would love to read about them.

Janelle Cox is an education writer who uses her experience and knowledge to provide creative and original writing in the field of education. Janelle holds a Master's of Science in Education from the State University of New York College at Buffalo. She is also the Elementary Education Expert for About.com, as well as a contributing writer to TeachHUB.com and TeachHUB Magazine. You can follow her at Twitter @Empoweringk6ed, or on Facebook at Empowering K6 Educators.

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