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Being a Student Makes Me a Better Teacher

Mark Isero

 

Being a Student Makes  Me a Better TeacherI’m in school (again), this time for a master’s in library and information science.

Although I’m not clear whether becoming a librarian makes sense to me, I do know that being a student makes me a better teacher.

 

I’m feeling the challenge, the stress, and the worry that I’m not good enough. I wonder if I’m doing my assignment right and what the professor will think. I procrastinate, get jittery, and then push through with multi-hour work marathons.  Sounds similar to what my students go through, right?

 

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Understanding Students' Struggles

The thing I have to remember is: I’ve always been good at school. Even when I’ve struggled, I’ve succeeded.

 

For my students, this hasn’t always been the case. School is not a place of confidence or comfort. It’s a place where, for more than 10 years, they’ve struggled, felt lost, and noticed their teachers not truly believing in them.

 

No wonder why they sometimes want to give up.

 

Finding Success After Failure

As their teacher, I have to understand my students and their journey to figure school out. I have to have empathy. But my empathy must not come from guilt or low expectations. Rather, it must come from the expectation of brilliance. While I expect greatness, I must also see failure as part of the process. In fact, if there is to be any true learning, there must be failure.

 

That’s why I’m excited about the way I’m teaching my English class this year. My students are writing an essay a week, which means lots of writing practice and peer review. Most important, there are many chances for success — and for failure. The best part about building in failure is that it’s also building in chances to rebound. After all, finding success after failure is stronger than always succeeding.

 

Have you experienced teaching while you were also a student? Share your experience in the comments section!

 

Republished with permission from the author. The original post appears on the Mark's Iserotope Teaching Blog.