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5 Teaching Strategies for Creating Effective, Engaging Lessons

Janelle Cox

Lesson plans lie on the heart of being an effective teacher. They are essentially the roadmap to which you follow to ensure that your students are learning. Creating effective and engaging lessons takes time to design and perfect, and they can truly demonstrate if a child truly understands a concept or not. How can you ensure that you’re delivering an effective lesson to your students? Is it by your students’ understanding of the information through assessment, or is it by your self-reflection? In order to ensure you are creating and delivering successful lessons to your students, you must follow a few teaching strategies. Here are the top five TeachHUB articles containing powerful teaching strategies that will give you more insight into creating the best and most effective and engaging lessons for your students.

Teaching Strategies to Deliver an Effective Lesson

If you were to design what you would think is the perfect lesson plan, what would it look like? Would you include in your lesson plan the steps you will take to deliver the lesson plan? Oftentimes teachers think that they know exactly what it takes to deliver an effective and engaging lesson, but then find out after the lesson is over that they really didn’t know after all. There are five basic strategies to follow when delivering a lesson. They are having a clear objective, modeling your expectations, actively engaging students, walking around the classroom to ensure students have understanding, and complimenting your students when they are doing what they’re supposed to be doing. This article will dig deeper into the five basic steps you need to take in order to deliver an effective lesson plan.

Teaching Strategies to Ensure Lesson Plan Success

Many teachers judge how well their lessons went by how well their students were engaged in the lesson or how much they participated, while others wait and judge come assessment time. The problem with waiting until you assess students is that not all students are good test takers. The best way to ensure lesson plan success is to use task-based learning like exit tickets or have students self-reflect on the lesson. Reflecting on what you’ve learned is one of the best ways to know if you have a clear understanding of what you’re learning, and exit tickets are a quick way for a teacher to know if the students grasped what they just learned. These are just two of the ways that you can ensure your lesson plans were successful. This article will give you three more effective strategies to try.

Teaching Strategies to Transform Your Lessons

One of the most effective and efficient things you can do as a teacher is to plan out your lesson ahead of time. Mapping things out ahead of time allows you to be flexible when it comes time to teaching the lesson. This means that you can make any changes or transform what you think may look boring into something more engaging for your students. For example, if you were to preplan a lesson that used a textbook, you can transform that lesson and go beyond the textbook to teach concepts through alternative methods like presentations, technology, or through group work. Another example of transforming you lessons is to use the “Goldilocks Approach.” This is when you’re planning your objective to make sure that it’s not too broad or specific, but just right for the students to understand. The above article gives you three more ways to transform your lessons to ensure students are getting the most out of them.

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Teaching Strategies to Make Your Lesson More Effective  

When you sit down to write a lesson plan, there are a few things that you need to ask yourself. First, you need to ask if you have set a clear objective. Second, you need to ask yourself if you have made time to model what you’re teaching students. Next, ask yourself if you were the student in class if you think the lesson would keep you interested. Fourth, ask yourself if you made room to monitor your students while they were working independently or in group work. Lastly, ask yourself if you made space for self-reflection. If you have inputted all of these elements into your lesson plan, then you have made it an effective one. This article will dig deeper into each of these five elements.

Teaching Strategies to Utilize Student Interest

Today’s teachers now include student interest when they are planning their lessons. They know that if they include what intrigues their students into their lesson, then they will have them engaged in the lesson and most likely that will lead to more participation among students. This article will give you specific teaching strategies to help cultivate an interest that will help our students understand information more deeply.

It’s essential that you take the time to reflect upon your lessons once you’ve taught them to your students. Each time that you reflect on what went well and what did not, you will grow and learn. Not every lesson will be a success, and that’s OK. Just remember those are the times that you learn the most from.

How do you create effective and engaging lesson plans? Do you incorporate any of the tips of teaching strategies mentioned in any of these articles? Please share with us in the comment section below, we’d love to hear from you on this topic.


Janelle Cox is an education writer who uses her experience and knowledge to provide creative and original writing in the field of education. Janelle holds Masters of Science in Education from the State University of New York College at Buffalo. She is a contributing writer to TeachHUB.com, TeachHUB Magazine, and Hey Teach. She was also the Elementary Education Expert for About.com for five years. You can follow her on Twitter @empoweringed, on Facebook at Empowering K12 Educatorsor contact her at Janellecox78@yahoo.com.